July 21

The Best Guide to Carbs in Nuts and Seeds

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The Ultimate Overview To Carbs In Nuts As well as Seeds will certainly aid improve any type of complication you might have with which nuts and also seeds to consume as well as which to stay clear of.

By recognizing the carb values, you quickly can make better, extra notified, options. Values are net g carbs per 100g.

Some are actually unusual. Have a look.

Keto Nuts

The ultimate guide to carbs in nuts and seeds

When you initially begin living reduced carb, I wager you were delighted to discover we can snack on nuts and also seeds once again.

We no more count calories and also we no more are afraid high-fat foods, actually, enhancing our healthy and balanced fats are urged.

Several individuals slide up by bing on nuts and also after that know their weight loss has actually quit and also question why.

They never ever make the link in between nuts and also the slow-moving creep of carbs back right into their diet regimen.

Keto Nuts

Why is that?

  • Quantity - Nuts are simple, mobile, and also so very easy to overdo. They can be oily and also salty which is created to strike our "bliss point".
  • High-Carbs - Numerous do not know just how high in carbs some nuts, as well as seeds, can be. I can listen to the moans currently as I inform you to prevent cashews, chestnuts as well as pistachios.
  • Snacking on nuts is a lot far better than snacking on high-carb processed food, as well as ground nuts such as almond flour are great for low-carb baking. Make no error, the quantity you might be consuming and also the high carb components of some nuts can be the number one saboteur of weight loss.
  • Allow's to take a better look at the most typical nuts as well as seeds with their carb values. All nutrition values stated are net carbs (total - fiber = net) and obtained from USDA values from cronometer.com Values may vary slightly depending on reference used.

The ultimate guide to carbs in nuts

Brazil nuts

Net carbs 4g per 100g Protein 14g per 100g

Brazil nuts also contain vitamin B1, E, copper, magnesium, selenium, zinc, and iron.

Keto Brazil Nuts

Brazil nuts seem to be harder to overindulge with because most people tend to grab just a few to snack on.

Brazil nuts can be lovely chopped up in grain-free granola. Don't cook them, but simply add them chopped once the granola has been cooked and cooled.

They add a lovely nutty flavor and texture to the recipe.

Brazil nuts are incredible if you dip them in dark chocolate for a little occasional treat.

Pecans

Net carbs 4g per 100g Protein 20g per 100g

Pecans also contain vitamin B1, copper, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, and zinc.

Keto Pecans

Pecans are amazing in sweet low-carb recipes, but baking with pecans soon adds up.

Cheesecake bases may require a cup or two of pecans, and pecan pies will require even more for the filling and for decoration.

With everything low-carb, it's all about awareness, then the choice is yours.

So just be aware of how many pecans go into a recipe, and enjoy a small slice.

Pumpkin seeds

Net carbs 5g per 100g Protein 30g per 100g

Pumpkin seeds also contain vitamin A, iron, magnesium, and phosphorus.

Keto Pumpkin Seeds

Pumpkin seeds can be a great little snack if you nibble on them one by one.

Some great recipes to use pumpkin seeds are grain-free granola bars or chocolate grain-free granola.

Some new low-carb flours are being introduced into the market, and one of them is pumpkin seed flour.

If you can't get hold of this near you, you can easily make your own by grinding raw pumpkin seeds in your food processor or coffee grinder.

Macadamias

Net carbs 5g per 100g Protein 8g per 100g

Macadamias also contain vitamins B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, copper, iron, magnesium, and manganese.

Keto Macadamia

Macadamia nuts are an incredibly popular low carb and keto snack because they contain 75% fat.

Macadamia oil is highly regarded due to its mild nutty flavor and higher omega 3/6 ratio.

Macadamia oil can be used in homemade mayonnaise, on salads, and in dressings.

Macadamia nuts are a great snack to carry around as the high-fat content will keep you fuller for longer.

Walnuts

Net carbs 7g per 100g Protein 15g per 100g

Walnuts also contain vitamin B1, folate, copper, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, and zinc.

Keto Walnuts

Walnuts are beautiful to decorate chocolate fat bombs, they are my secret ingredient in sugar-free Nutella and are amazing when dipped in dark chocolate for a little occasional treat.

Walnuts add a creamy texture similar to hazelnuts, but without all that fiddly roasting, then removing the shells. No one has time for that.

Walnuts are also amazing in these sugar-free walnut and brandy truffles. If you haven't tried them yet, go ahead. Warning, I like them boozy.

Peanuts

Net carbs 7g per 100g Protein 26g per 100g

Peanuts also contain vitamins B1, B3, B5, B6, E, folate, copper, magnesium, manganese, and zinc.

Keto Peanuts

Peanuts are one of the most controversial nuts here because they are actually legumes.

Many people avoid legumes because of the anti-nutrients, namely lectin, and phytic acid. What do these toxins do? They are proteins that are said to bind to cell membranes.

They can damage the lining of the intestine which may cause discomfort and bloat.

Some studies however show that lectins are found in many common everyday foods so are not restricted to legumes and beans.

So enjoy them if you can tolerate them, and they are within your carb allowance.

Hazelnuts

Net carbs 13g per 100g Protein 7g per 100g

Hazelnuts also contain vitamins B1, B6, E, copper, magnesium, manganese, and zinc.

Keto Hazelnut

Hazelnuts are commonly found in this well-known chocolate spread, but did you know there are generally only 5 hazelnuts in an entire jar?

And did know that one mother took them to court to repute their health claims, and won! To this day, that slogan had to be removed from the packaging.

What's worse, is that there is more sugar in the chocolate hazelnut spread than a chocolate bar.

So think twice before you spread candy on your kid's toast.

Pine Nuts

Net carbs 13g per 100g Protein 8g per 100g

Pine nuts also contain vitamins B1, B3, E, K, copper, magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc.

Keto Pine Nuts

Pine nuts are commonly found in pesto, and leave a lovely creamy texture.

But unfortunately, they are expensive to harvest and expensive to buy.

I make my own pesto, but I make mine with kale and I managed to develop a recipe that is nut-free and pine nut-free.

Why not try my salmon zoodles with kale pesto and feta, you can't get much healthier than that. Low-carb heaven in a bowl.

Chia Seeds

Net carbs 8g per 100g Protein 16g per 100g

Chia seeds also contain vitamin B6, K, copper, calcium, and almost every trace mineral such as iron, magnesium, manganese, selenium, and zinc.

Keto Chia Seeds

Chia seeds also have a whopping 18% omega 3. One of the highest plant sources of omega 3 which makes them incredibly popular with vegetarians and vegans.

Chia seeds are versatile because they have virtually no flavor, they absorb any liquid, then swell too many times their size.

They can be used as pudding, drinks, or breakfast meals. Vegans even use "chia eggs".

Water is added to chia, the chis swells, and the whole "chia egg" can be used in various baking with varied success.

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Almonds

Net carbs 10g per 100g Protein 21g per 100g

Almonds also contain vitamins B2, B3, E, copper, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, and zinc.

Keto Almonds

Almonds are commonly used in low-carb baking as almond meal, almond flour, and ground almonds,

They are simply variations on ground almonds but differ in texture and grade.

Almond flour is generally finer grade and the almonds have had their skins removed.

Almond meal and ground almonds are the same, coarser grade. Some brands remove the skin, others you may see little brown flecks which is the skin that was left on during grinding.

Personally, I prefer ground almonds/almond meal as it is cheaper and makes for a lovely alternative to breadcrumbs in many savory recipes.

Sunflower Seeds

Net carbs 21g per 100g Protein 11g per 100g

Sunflower seeds also contain vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, E, copper, selenium, and zinc.

Keto Sunflower Seeds

Sunflower seeds are often used in granolas, grain-free granola bars and are becoming more popular as an alternative low-carb flour for those who cannot tolerate almond flour.

If you can't find sunflower meal (flour) near you, you can make your own by grinding them in a coffee grinder or food processor.

I have successfully made Fat Head pizza using sunflower meal when I ran out of almond meal.

Pistachios

Net carbs 18g per 100g Protein 20g per 100g

Pistachios also contain vitamins B1, B6, K, copper, phosphorus, and zinc.

Keto Pistachios

Pistachios are becoming increasingly expensive, and because they are incredibly high in net carbs, I very rarely buy them.

The only reason I might buy them is to use pistachios for decoration using their lovely purple/green coloring.

They look beautiful stirred through low-carb ice cream, or to garnish a coconut fat bomb.

Cashews

Net carbs 26g per 100g Protein 18g per 100g

Cashews also contain vitamins B1, B6, K, copper, magnesium, manganese, and zinc.

Keto Cashews

Cashews are the nut that most people find hardest to give up at the beginning of living low carb.

They are often cooked in oil, salted, and accompany a drink. The oil is often found to be a vegetable oil the salt/oil combination hits our 'bliss point'.

Cashews are creamy and are often used in "healthy" recipes to replace dairy.

Many vegans use cashew milk, cashew cream, and even cashew cheese.

Cashews are often used for the base of a raw cheesecake (along with Medjool dates) so can you just imagine how high in carbs (albeit unprocessed ones) these "healthy" recipes are.

So just be aware of what goes into a recipe when eating out, and what a recipe calls for on the internet. All "healthy" recipes are not created equally.

Chestnuts

Net carbs 27g per 100g Protein g per 100g

Chestnuts also contain vitamins B1, B6, C, folate, and copper.

I once made the mistake of buying chestnuts and baking them in the oven without doing my research.

Well, mistake number one was not to read the carb value (some reference quote chestnut up to 56% carbs) and mistake number two was not to read the baking instructions.

Let's just say my entire kitchen was covered in exploding chestnuts.

I discovered my lesson and also will certainly never ever before acquire these little fools once again.

The best overview of carbs in nuts

Which one will you never ever purchase once again?

I snack on them periodically, I do not purchase baked or oiled nuts and also I placed a couple of in my hand after that placed the package back in my kitchen.

Nuts, as well as seeds, are charming to snack on, filled with micronutrients and also minerals, however, it is handy to understand the number of carbs that remain in each to make an enlightened selection.

Invest your carbs sensibly.

Track Your Nutrition & Health Data with cronometer.com
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